Publications

Pension Tax Expenditures. A Costly Christmas Gift … Not From Santa

| 4 January 2017
Blog, Fiscal | Tags: Fiscal, Inequality, Pensions, Tax Expenditures
For people living in Switzerland, December 31 was the last day for 2016 contributions into their Pillar 3a retirement accounts – and hence for taking advantage of the exemption from income tax that these payments benefit from. The scheme is one of many examples from ... continue reading

Tax Expenditures and Sustainability. An Overview

| 11 November 2016
Discussion Notes, Fiscal | Tags: Employment, Energy, Fossil Fuel Subsidies, Health, Housing, Inequality, Innovation, Patent Boxes, Pensions, Tax Expenditures, VAT
Fiscal policy has significant effects on a broad sustainability agenda covering long-term economic, social and environmental goals. However, whereas a myriad of actors scrutinize taxation as well as direct government spending with regard to their impact on sustainability, a key feature of fiscal policy has ... continue reading

Climate Change, Carbon Pricing and Energy Tax Expenditures

| 6 October 2016
Blog, Fiscal | Tags: Carbon Pricing, Climate Change, Energy, Tax Expenditures
Climate change is moving up policy agendas worldwide. Last year’s COP21 was yet another wake-up call that the international community needs to take urgent action to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The main outcome of the meeting, the Paris Agreement, was a significant milestone in ... continue reading

South-South Preferential Trade Agreements in Services – Economic Potential Lying Idle

| 4 October 2016
Blog, Trade | Tags: Services Trade, WTO
Imagine the Central African Republic and Cameroon investing in the compatibility and quality of their railway tracks, and eventually merging their railways altogether. The producers in the Central African Republic would get easy access to the sea, while Cameroon’s railway and ports would benefit from ... continue reading

Quantitative Easing Is Back – But Will It Help the Real Economy?

| 15 August 2016
Blog, Monetary | Tags: QE
Last week the Bank of England surprised commentators with the scale of its post-Brexit monetary stimulus package. It included a new £70bn round of quantitative easing (QE), the first since 2012, as well as the more widely predicted 0.25% cut to interest rates. The idea ... continue reading